Who is it that you seek?

Before you can begin a journey, you must have a destination in mind.  Sure, we’ve all jumped in the car and driven aimlessly on a journey of discovery, but usually if you’re going someplace, you are, well, going to some place.  In Casino Marketing and Player Development, the same is true.  In order to get somewhere, you have to know where you’re going.

So how does this relate to the title?  Well, this is a blog about goal positioning, after all, and usually the biggest component of casino hosts’ goals is related to their players and the revenue those players generate.  It follows, then, that finding the right players makes it easier to set the right goals.  Right?  Right.

Take a look at the profile of your hosts’ player lists.  Is the average trip frequency pretty high?  Is the average ADT on the higher end of your target range?  Do you (and more importantly, do your hosts) know enough about these players to put faces to the names when you see them on the lists?   If so, to some degree, this is a good thing because it means you know your players.  But, if most of your coded players are known to you and your team, there are probably players in your database who are underserved and worthy of your hosts team’s attention.  Assigning those players to your hosts instead will drive increased revenue.

Look next at your host team’s theoretical targets for the last few quarters.  Has there been growth or are they struggling to achieve? If there has been some growth, from where did the growth come? Prospecting worthy new and unknown players is key, and I suspect that you have some hosts who are aces at finding and activating those players…and some who aren’t.  Identifying the sources of additional revenues will allow you to target similar players and increase your team’s growth even more.

You can give those hosts who are skittish about prospecting  a nudge in the right direction by providing prospective players for them.  Do some digging and determine what kinds of players are in your database who offer some potential for increased visitation and/or play, then assign them to your hosts for contact and activation. We call them “players of interest,” and understanding the typical player of interest in your database (particularly in terms of potential worth to your property long term) is the first step in turning those folks into loyal patrons.

Look for players of high worth and low trip frequency first and foremost.  Odds are they’re playing someplace else and your host team can steal a trip or two simply by establishing contact and starting to build a relationship with them.  Scoop up players with a minimum of two trips in the recent past and whose ADT is promising.  The specifics are going to be unique to your property and market, but don’t shoot too low.

Do you have some numbers in your head already?  Good!  Now decide how much activity the hosts have to generate from these players in order to have them coded.  How many trips must they make in how much time?  What must their ADT or cumulative theoretical or actual loss be in that time?

Once you’ve done that, you can set new theoretical targets for the team based on the activation of these prospect players and drive more revenue for your property.  That is, after all, what your host team is supposed to do.

Harvest Trends can help you with this task, particularly if you are short on database resources.  The HostMAPP dashboard and the Daily Action Plan will allow you to identify, assign and track the activity of these valuable guests from beginning to end. Our new host-dpecific DRM (named BoB, for BOok of Business) enables you to see in real time whether or not your hots are contacting the players of interest you’e assigned for them. It alerts you and your hosts every day to their success and pace to achieving the goals you’ve set for them.

Contact Amy for a 30-minute demo (or to ask questions) today!

Advertisements

Relationship 101 (7 Timeless Principles)

After many years in the casino business, and having known lots of people in both my personal and professional lives, a handful of solid relationship-building principles have clarified themselves to me. Fortunately, these principles are universal in their application.  They work whether the relationship in question is a personal or professional one, and their usefulness is evident after only a short while. The Golden Rule is golden for a reason; treating others the way you would like to be treated makes perfect sense, even if not everyone follows it.  These simple principles are all tied to the Golden Rule at their core, but it seems that they just don’t come naturally to everyone.  In Casino Player Development, however, the diligent use of these principles may well make the difference between failure and success.

  1. Be truthful.  Always.  Fortunately, this principle doesn’t require you to automatically blab everything you know about anything.  It DOES, however, preclude you from telling an outright lie.  For example, when you have to tell a guest something he or she doesn’t want to hear, find a way to say it that is truthful and polite without over-sharing.  Say something like, “Sally, I am so sorry you weren’t invited to the VIP event we had last weekend.  The qualifications for the invitation were very particular, and I couldn’t get permission to include you.”   The first part is true because nobody wants to have this conversation in the first place, and the second would be true even if you didn’t ask for permission to include her, knowing her play didn’t meet the criteria.  You didn’t have to tell her the criteria, and she understands now (even if she doesn’t like it) that her play is the reason she wasn’t included.   See how that works? Even if you don’t really like Sally, you owe her an honest response. This applies to everyone.
  2. Accept people as they are.  Don’t try to change people.  They are who they are, each and every one of them, and it’s not up to you to decide whether that’s okay or not.  Even the most difficult people are that way for a reason, and to build an effective relationship with someone, you have to know and accept who he is.  You don’t have to understand why, but you DO have to accept it.  I learned this lesson as a step-parent, and it’s one I have to remind myself to do daily.  Sure, it’s my responsibility to help raise these children, but that doesn’t give me the right to ask them to be someone other than who they are.  I can guide them to what I believe to be a better path and set them upon it, but ultimately it’s up to them to choose which one they’ll take.  It’s the same with guests or co-workers, friends, significant others, and every other person with whom you interact in the world.  As Popeye told us, “I am what I am.”
  3. Don’t take everything personally.  Sure, sometimes that nasty comment was meant personally, but not every upsetting thing you hear was intended to hurt you.   Think about how upset your guests sometimes get over the perceived value of their offers, and you can see how people can get all worked up over something that was never meant as a statement of their personal value.  Don’t let that happen to you.  People who are angry often lash out in unnecessarily hurtful ways, and you will almost certainly get caught in the crossfire at least once in your life.  Keep your wits about you, take a deep breath and respond to the issue instead of the barb.
  4. Learn to anticipate the needs of others.  I see this in action every time I walk into my local Walmart on a rainy day and note the umbrella bag display.  In this case, as in so many others, there is a smidgen of self-preservation involved, as the floor will undoubtedly stay drier (and safer) if wet umbrellas are encased in plastic bags as they accompany their owners throughout the store, but it’s also a way the reviled retailer has anticipated customers’ needs.  As a host, this is an invaluable skill, and it will certainly make you happier in all your relationships.  It’s not even difficult to do.  Note the things that matter to your guests and your bosses, then strive to meet their expectation before it’s been announced. (I’m pretty sure the cup of coffee my husband gently wakes me to drink whenever I have to get up early makes his day nicer too, but mostly because it makes my day start with more civility.)
  5. Place blame appropriately and tactfully.  It is a simple fact of life that things will go wrong, and according to Murphy’s Law, it will happen at the worst possible moment.  The aftermath can be so much better if the blame game can be handled with some diplomacy.  In the workplace, a postmortem review is often used to learn from what went awry, and they can be difficult at best.  I’ve been involved in a few that were excruciating, and I couldn’t help but think that they might have been more productive if they had been handled with a bit more grace.  Don’t rail at someone for a mistake (or the results thereof), and try to remember that none of us is perfect, so bad things do indeed happen to good people.  In fact, if possible, worry less about blame and put the emphasis on learning from what went wrong instead of who flubbed in the first place.
  6. Own your mistakes.  This is such an integral part of a solid relationship that it could make or break one  all by itself.  When you make a mistake, it is ultimately up to you to take responsibility for it and immediately take steps to make things right.  Don’t hedge, don’t play the martyr, just own it.  If you forgot to make the reservation, tell the player the truth.  Then, in your next breath, tell him what you can do about it.  If you have a good reason for the error, include it if it is relevant, but don’t if it’s not.  (To test relevancy, ask yourself whether it would make any difference if you were the one hearing about it.)  People will learn that they can trust you if you can accept responsibility for your failures.
  7. Listen.  I’ve saved the most important one for last.  Because I’m a talker, this one is difficult for me.  I always have something to say, but I have come to realize that I learn more when my mouth is firmly shut.  Learning more about someone is an essential part of building a relationship with them, because it can’t be a true relationship if it’s all about you.  Think for a moment of your best friend.  Could you tell me about his or her favorite color, food, style of hat, animal or hand gesture?  Sure you could.  Now think about the last time you talked together.  Was the exchange closer to a 50/50 in terms of time spent talking?   That’s how you know those things.  Whenever you talk with someone, talk WITH them.  Take turns.  Listen and learn.  With everybody.

What relationship-building essentials have I left out?  Tell us in the comments.

 

10 Biggest Mistakes Casino Hosts Make

marquee

It is my habit to be positive, but that outlook hasn’t always served me well.  Giving everyone the benefit of the doubt certainly helps me seem more likable, but I don’t always see when someone’s motives are suspect.  On the other hand, the things people do wrong aren’t always motivated by bad intent.  So, continuing both myarticles specifically targeted to casino hosts and my tendency to be positive, I’ll provide some examples of things hosts should NOT do, and I’ll even explain why.  As we look toward 2015 with hopeful hearts, here are some behaviors to avoid to make the new year a great one.

For more host advice, please see my post entitled “10 Tips for Casino Hosts” and also check out “Casino Host Basics.”

  1. Sticking to the “tried and true” without considering the adoption of new methods or prospects is a mistake that can manifest itself in many ways. Some hosts always call the same players for every event (without going a bit deeper into their player lists) to fill a quota. Others do the same kind of player party or gathering, or work with a trusted handful of event types or themes. There are hosts who recycle an old letter to one’s players with updated information and instead of writing one from scratch every time. Spread your wings!  Embrace the creativity!  If you’re in a rut, get yourself and your players out of it. If not, don’t fall into one. Ask for ideas if you need to; just don’t be boring or predictable all the time.
  2. Being less than truthful is always a no no. Obviously, you can’t tell your guests everything , but if what you say has truth at its base, you’re staying on the moral high ground. If you have to deny a request for a comp exception, please don’t tell the player, “My boss said I’ve given you too much already and I’ll be written up if I issue you the comp you asked for” even if that’s exactly what your boss said. Decide before you contact the player how you will tell them a truthful reason for your denial of their request. I would start with something like, “I would love nothing more than to give you what you requested, but because I comped you *insert comp info here* and *another example,* I am unable to grant your most recent request.” Have some responses to protests all prepped and ready to go, too.  “I know it’s your *insert special occasion here* so I can offer you *something less than what they asked for* based on your most recent play.” Don’t use excuses. Tell it to them straight. They will know if you lie to them and they will talk about it if you do.
  3. Adopting a “one-man-band” attitude is detrimental to the department as a whole and doesn’t serve your players well. Hosts are usually part of a team, and they should ideally behave as such. When you’re off property, someone else should be empowered and comfortable taking care of your players. When you’re on property, you should be taking care of other host’s players. That way the whole team is more successful overall, and guests don’t fall between the cracks when their host is unavailable.
  4. Failing to listen, whether to your boss, your co-workers, or your guests means you aren’t a very good host. When someone is talking to you, pay attention to what they say and how they say it. Instead of thinking of how you’ll reply, read body language and consider the words and tone of voice you hear. Then stop and formulate an answer based on all the available information instead of just reacting. This habit will serve you well in all your relationships.
  5. Going rogue and disregarding rules or policies will do no more than get you into trouble. If the comp guideline is 10% of theo or loss don’t issue more than that without an easy-to-communicate justification. If you break a rule, you have, in fact, created a new rule…and if it is unsustainable, you have also created a problem. Ask questions if you don’t understand a policy or procedure, and follow your property’s rules, even if you don’t entirely agree with them.
  6. Voicing your dissenting opinion in the wrong company can get you into some really deep hot water. I’m not suggesting that you should always keep your opinion to yourself whether it’s in agreement or not, but always consider your audience. I’ve heard stories of hosts who were overheard (by guests) exclaiming  their disdain for certain situations or changes, then the word was out on the floor. Before you know it, tongues are wagging and the host’s name is being muttered in the executive offices. (NOT the best way to get attention from the C-Suite, mind you.) Always be tactful and kind, but firm if you must be. Pick the right audience and the right venue before sharing your thoughts.
  7. Becoming unprofessionally close to your players is a minefield. Allowing a work relationship to become too personal can be a slippery slope. Refrain from getting too close to a particular player because it opens the door to the appearance of impropriety, even if none exists. This kind of conflict of interest could be damaging to the host’s career, emotional state, and well-being. It’s best to keep things businesslike, but friendly. Find the balance. (I know of a few hosts who have had successful long-term relationships with patrons, but they are the exception rather than the rule. Tread carefully.)
  8. Believing that you know all you need to know can be a dangerous trap. In this new gaming reality, knowledge is power. Learn about new technologies, your competitors’ programs, your players preferences, how your own property’s programs work, and how to best use the tools at your disposal. There is always something new to learn and leverage to take the best possible care of your players.
  9. Depending on a small, core group of your players to drive the bulk of your list’s revenue is simply shortsighted. Keep looking for worthy prospects, especially if they aren’t supplied to you. Carve out some floor time and use the hot player screens to identify players who seem to be spending well and introduce yourself to them. Keep in contact with all of your players and prospects to drive additional trips or find problems that may prevent them from coming in. It’s your job to smooth the way for your guests to visit your property more often than they visit any other. That principle applies to every player of worth. Don’t forsake them for your “pet” players.
  10. Keeping player feedback to yourself is another way to set yourself up for failure. When a player shares something with you, it is entirely likely that they expect some action on your part to either resolve or share their experience with someone who can make it right. Whether positive or negative, it is part of your role to represent the players’ interests with your boss or other departments as necessary to ensure everyone concerned knows as much about the situation as you do. Keeping players happy within the guidelines your property has set is, after all, what hosts do.

Remember, your success is related as much to what you don’t do as it is to what you accomplish. If you have additional traps or host mistakes to share, please do.

Social Gaming and Casino Player Development

Log into your Facebook account, if you would.  We’ll wait.  Okay.  Thanks.  Now, click on the words “Games Feed” in the Apps menu on the left side of the page.  It’s probably next to one of the first items displayed in your News Feed.  Got it?  Great!

What you see there (and will see in your News Feed if you haven’t blocked them) are updates from your friends who play social games online.  If you look in the Apps menu, you can find literally hundreds of games and see which of your friends are playing them.  You can, if you wish, join your friends (Facebook encourages you to do so!) and play “together.”  You can spend real money (but you can’t cash it out), exchange gifts with other players, receive gifts and rewards for playing the game(s), and have a great deal of fun.  For those of you who can’t play the slots at work, you can play slots or blackjack online with your friends.

Sound familiar?  If you are reading this blog, it certainly should sound like a familiar world to you.  It’s filled with people who find enjoyment in gaming (of some sort) playing together (in a manner of speaking) for relaxation.  It’s the same kind of activity your casino provides.  And they are people with lots of similarities to the ones your host team takes care of and nurtures relationships with.

Even if you don’t participate in social gaming yourself, you can look at your own Facebook Games Feed and see that lots of people are playing lots of games.  People you know.  In a surprise twist, I found friends online who played casino games who I never imagined in a casino in all my years.

Since the casino patron pool is aging, it is important to continue driving trial visits from new patrons.  Getting those new patrons into the rewards program and marketing to them directly is going to be key, particularly in the competitive US gaming markets.  Because so many young gamers are completely comfortable in the online space, it would be beneficial to any casino operator to reach out to those players and build a bridge to induce a trial visit to the property.

How can a bricks and mortar operation appeal to an online gamer?  It ought to be pretty easy, in theory.  But the reality is that a younger casino patron is going to expect something more for making the trip to the casino, as she can get a very similar experience online, at home, in her pajamas if she wants.  Start by finding someone who is completely comfortable in the social gaming arena and ask them to help you come up with a plan to identify and appeal to social gamers in your casino’s marketplace.

To attract the casual social gamer, casinos should provide value.  Once you’ve identified them, here are some things you can do to get them to visit your property.

  •  When purchasing entertainment, be sure to include “acquisition” acts that appeal to a younger audience.  Price the tickets to accommodate an audience who may not have as much disposable income as any of us would like.
  • Offer a variety of really good food options and price them in alignment with (or lower than) comparable restaurants in your area.
  • Train ALL of your employees to acknowledge new faces and encourage new visitors to join the players club so you can market to as many people as possible.
  • Make sure your gaming associates understand how to communicate with a variety of players and that they provide a positive experience.
  • Create the right environment for the guests you have at any given time.  Adjust lighting, music, and even staff to accommodate the customers you have.  For example, on Friday morning, oldies or doo wop makes sense, but on Friday night, you’ll want music from the ’80’s or ’90’s since there’s likely to be a younger crowd on the gaming floor.

Then, once you get them into the database, make sure you are mining regularly to identify those who have just joined the club so you can begin marketing to them right away.  Have hosts call those with the highest worth to make an offer even before your mail reaches them.  Ensure that new member offers are personalized and appeal to the recipient based on gaming preference, market,  and gender.

Social gamers are just casino patrons who don’t know it yet.  It’s your job to give them a reason to come to your casino instead of a competitor’s.  Find someone who can help you navigate this new territory and invite those players to see what you have to offer.

Getting With the Program

Host goals should be in alignment with the property’s overall marketing direction. Hosts should have an understanding of the profitability of their players, and their authority to supercede or supplement a player’s existing offers should be dependent upon their understanding of the total reinvestment in that guest.

It sounds like common sense, right? How often, though, do the “traditional” marketers and the Player Development team join forces to ensure that their goals and objectives are in alignment? When it’s time to establish or update the host team’s goals, it’s also time to communicate with marketing team leaders to determine whether what seems obvious is in fact still the right direction for the hosts. As you review your results each goal period and launch the next, it is a good time to look back at the team’s benchmarks, assess the goals and objectives of both the team and the property, them determine whether any adjustments are needed for the next couple of quarters.

If your host team is killing it, and they are surpassing their goals pretty readily (bless them!), then it may be time to up the ante, so to speak. Do some database mining and find the players who aren’t visiting as often or playing as much as they should, decide how much revenue is left on the table, then set new theo targets. Or, if you aren’t doing it already, round-robin assign new members of worth and include the anticipated play and trips in your hosts’ next set of goals.

If your host team is struggling to achieve the targets they’ve been given, perhaps a realignment with marketing is overdue and would be beneficial for everyone.  Take a look at how the hosts are spending their time, evaluate their player lists and see if there are some players who need to be replaced with those of higher worth and lower frequency, and let marketing handle the maintenance for a quarter while the hosts drive some revenue and taste success again.

Honestly, there is never a bad time to step back and take a higher-level look at your Player Development team’s contribution to the overarching marketing program. It also seems there is never enough time, either.   Make a list of your questions, get them answered, and set aside some time to make sense of what you learn.  stablish your processes for measurement and follow-up before making changes to the host program, set the new targets, communicate them to the team, and you’re good to go.  You don’t have to wait until the end of the goal period to get started.

In fact, there are several consultants and technology companies who can provide you an objective view of your operation. FInding the right partner to validate what you believe to be true, point out things you might not have known, and hand you a list of low-hanging fruit may be just what you need to refine your efforts and set the team up for success. Harvest Trends offers both the technological assistance and consultant’s view to benefit our partners to the fullest. Want to know more? Visit our website at www.harvesttrends.com, call us at 877-277-5661, or sign up for our newsletter to learn how we can help you.

Does your Player Development team have the right goals?

It’s of paramount importance in today’s marketplace that goals and objectives are in alignment across the enterprise regardless of the business you’re in.   Obviously, it’s more than beneficial to have everyone in the boat rowing in the same direction; these days it’s critical in maintaining ever-slimmer margins and productivity levels. It is a stark reality that the security of people’s jobs are often depend upon prudent management and the best possible use of a company’s assets.

There is never a bad time to take stock and evaluate whether or not the course you set in your earlier plans is still the right path to reach your destination.  It’s worth considering your original destination as well, while you’re at it. Talk with your counterparts in other departments and determine whether your team’s longer-term objective is still the one that best serves the enterprise.

For Casino Player Development, that means it’s time to look at all the elements of the team’s goals and determine whether or not changes should be made to either the financial or performance-related accomplishments the team is expected to make.  It’s important to take a step back and look at the big picture from the property’s perspective, do some analysis, and determine how PD can best support the overarching  role marketing is being asked to play in the property’s success.

Reactivation

Are there a large number of good players who haven’t made a visit to your property in the past 90+ days who need to be contacted by a host to generate some return trips?  If so, your host team should have goals to reactivate some of those guests.  Getting these players back before they defect is a concept I call preemptive reactivation.  Learn more about it here. Identify the players in question and assign them for a host to call, then credit the host with the play he generates as a result.

Acquisition

Maybe the property is focused on signing up new players.  To support that effort, your host team’s goals should include targets based on the number of high-worth new members they get back to your property within a month of their club enrollment.  Establish a minimum ADT and number of trips a worthy new player must make before he can be coded to the host and credit the host with the activity generated by his new players.

Retention

If the hosts’ coded lists have an activity level of less than 75% during a quarter, perhaps a retention goal is in order. Determine whether the coded players are on pace to maintain their average frequency, identify players who aren’t playing to their tier status, and get the hosts working on those folks to generate visits at a higher frequency or ADT.  For more on generating visits from loyal players without spending a lot of money, check out my blog post on that topic here

Host Potential

If your market is in flux (as are so many regional operators’ today), you may or may not still be targeting the right players.  Do some digging and figure out where the Player Development team’s “sweet spot” is in terms of minimum ADT.  There are undoubtedly players at your property who are coded to a host but shouldn’t be.  Conversely, it’s almost a certainty that there are also players who should be coded to a host but who aren’t.  While you’re ensuring that the team’s goals are aligned with the property’s expectations of marketing, doesn’t it make sense to be sure the hosts are reaching the right players to achieve their goals?  Decide whether re-coding is in order, and make sure the hosts know how to communicate with your guests about any changes you make.

Activity Measurement

For each of the larger objectives, set and measure the host’s targets any number of ways: # of guests contacted, % who returned, add uncoded players of worth and reward more for their visits, total # trips generated, # hotel bookings, # event bookings…the possibilities are limited only by your ability to track the results.  Each goal should include any associated offers or instructions the hosts may need. Communicate things like event details, upcoming shows, and guidelines for comps and handling exceptional guest requests at the same time as the new goals.  If you do the whole thing in writing, that’s even better.

Do a check of resources before finalizing any changes to the host’s goal structure, too.  Getting approvals for your new goals may turn out to be easier than quantifying the results at the end of the goal period.  Gather the resources (both human and otherwise) and make sure you and the hosts will have everything you need along the way to be sure you’re still on track.   Then you and the Player Development team will be ready to show ’em how it’s done.

Assessing a Player Development Team

In most companies, employees receive annual evaluations to document their performance over a year’s time.  Some companies also require team leaders to evaluate their workers periodically (monthly, quarterly) to ensure they are on track and that their job performance is meeting certain milestones along the way.  I have long believed that an annual evaluation should never hold surprises for the recipient, as ongoing feedback and course corrections are beneficial to both the individual and the organization.  Wouldn’t it be even more beneficial, then, to have the ability to see on a daily basis whether a single employee or the entire team are on pace to achieve their goals?

In Casino Player Development, hosts sometimes miss out on bonuses by a few thousand dollars of theoretical.  When one has a goal of around a million dollars in theo over the course of a quarter, a miss of $5196 is a huge disappointment.  In the same way, it is embarrassing to miss a new member target by only a handful of active players…you see where this is going, right?  Knowing on a daily basis how each member of the team is trending makes it easy to provide ongoing feedback and encouragement to help them avoid that disappointment.

Establish reporting to give you an update every day on which hosted players were at the property, what you spent on them and what they spent with you.  Aggregated according to your department’s goals, see how many new members joined or returned, how many overdue guests have come back, how much theoretical has grown, and how many trips the regulars have made.  Every day.  As soon as someone is off course, both the host and team leader are aware of it so corrections and adjustments can be made.  Now.

If you aren’t already tracking the achievements and pacing to goal for your PD team (or if you’re a host who is flying blind) please allow me to recommend that you begin by taking a look at past achievements in order to plan for the future.  Setting a benchmark allows you to look back at past performance to show growth or where efforts are lacking in comparison.  In my series about setting and tracking host goals, I suggest that breaking a goal down into equal parts spread over the course of the goal period allows one to track whether one is on pace or not for each goal and objective.  That way, it’s easy to determine where the hosts’ efforts should be concentrated on any given day in order to ultimately achieve the goals he’s working toward. If you are a team leader, you are already responsible for reporting on the achievements of your team, and you need to be able to speak to their individual achievements as well as the aggregated accomplishments of your team.  So it makes sense to track how the hosts perform over time and note trends, how often they reach objectives and goals and which ones present a challenge to the team.

Using the benchmark, it’s a simple matter to show either the host or the C-suite what the strengths and weaknesses are for the team as a whole or as individuals, and where daily information has had an impact.  Along the way, be sure to compare the PD team’s results to property performance amid any market fluctuations, weather issues, construction, etc. that may have affected numbers.

Your host team should be driving play at a higher frequency, activity percentage, average theoretical and profitability than the direct mail program does.  Ideally, you’d be able to compare and contrast hosted players with unhosted players of similar worth, as in a split test.  If the hosted players aren’t spending more time and money at your property than those who don’t have a host, figuring out why can have a positive impact on your property’s bottom line.  Individual hosts who understand which players to move and why will also see their bottom line increase if your program includes bonuses for goal achievement.  That way, everybody wins!