Does your Player Development team have the right goals?

It’s of paramount importance in today’s marketplace that goals and objectives are in alignment across the enterprise regardless of the business you’re in.   Obviously, it’s more than beneficial to have everyone in the boat rowing in the same direction; these days it’s critical in maintaining ever-slimmer margins and productivity levels. It is a stark reality that the security of people’s jobs are often depend upon prudent management and the best possible use of a company’s assets.

There is never a bad time to take stock and evaluate whether or not the course you set in your earlier plans is still the right path to reach your destination.  It’s worth considering your original destination as well, while you’re at it. Talk with your counterparts in other departments and determine whether your team’s longer-term objective is still the one that best serves the enterprise.

For Casino Player Development, that means it’s time to look at all the elements of the team’s goals and determine whether or not changes should be made to either the financial or performance-related accomplishments the team is expected to make.  It’s important to take a step back and look at the big picture from the property’s perspective, do some analysis, and determine how PD can best support the overarching  role marketing is being asked to play in the property’s success.

Reactivation

Are there a large number of good players who haven’t made a visit to your property in the past 90+ days who need to be contacted by a host to generate some return trips?  If so, your host team should have goals to reactivate some of those guests.  Getting these players back before they defect is a concept I call preemptive reactivation.  Learn more about it here. Identify the players in question and assign them for a host to call, then credit the host with the play he generates as a result.

Acquisition

Maybe the property is focused on signing up new players.  To support that effort, your host team’s goals should include targets based on the number of high-worth new members they get back to your property within a month of their club enrollment.  Establish a minimum ADT and number of trips a worthy new player must make before he can be coded to the host and credit the host with the activity generated by his new players.

Retention

If the hosts’ coded lists have an activity level of less than 75% during a quarter, perhaps a retention goal is in order. Determine whether the coded players are on pace to maintain their average frequency, identify players who aren’t playing to their tier status, and get the hosts working on those folks to generate visits at a higher frequency or ADT.  For more on generating visits from loyal players without spending a lot of money, check out my blog post on that topic here

Host Potential

If your market is in flux (as are so many regional operators’ today), you may or may not still be targeting the right players.  Do some digging and figure out where the Player Development team’s “sweet spot” is in terms of minimum ADT.  There are undoubtedly players at your property who are coded to a host but shouldn’t be.  Conversely, it’s almost a certainty that there are also players who should be coded to a host but who aren’t.  While you’re ensuring that the team’s goals are aligned with the property’s expectations of marketing, doesn’t it make sense to be sure the hosts are reaching the right players to achieve their goals?  Decide whether re-coding is in order, and make sure the hosts know how to communicate with your guests about any changes you make.

Activity Measurement

For each of the larger objectives, set and measure the host’s targets any number of ways: # of guests contacted, % who returned, add uncoded players of worth and reward more for their visits, total # trips generated, # hotel bookings, # event bookings…the possibilities are limited only by your ability to track the results.  Each goal should include any associated offers or instructions the hosts may need. Communicate things like event details, upcoming shows, and guidelines for comps and handling exceptional guest requests at the same time as the new goals.  If you do the whole thing in writing, that’s even better.

Do a check of resources before finalizing any changes to the host’s goal structure, too.  Getting approvals for your new goals may turn out to be easier than quantifying the results at the end of the goal period.  Gather the resources (both human and otherwise) and make sure you and the hosts will have everything you need along the way to be sure you’re still on track.   Then you and the Player Development team will be ready to show ’em how it’s done.

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