Assessing a Player Development Team

In most companies, employees receive annual evaluations to document their performance over a year’s time.  Some companies also require team leaders to evaluate their workers periodically (monthly, quarterly) to ensure they are on track and that their job performance is meeting certain milestones along the way.  I have long believed that an annual evaluation should never hold surprises for the recipient, as ongoing feedback and course corrections are beneficial to both the individual and the organization.  Wouldn’t it be even more beneficial, then, to have the ability to see on a daily basis whether a single employee or the entire team are on pace to achieve their goals?

In Casino Player Development, hosts sometimes miss out on bonuses by a few thousand dollars of theoretical.  When one has a goal of around a million dollars in theo over the course of a quarter, a miss of $5196 is a huge disappointment.  In the same way, it is embarrassing to miss a new member target by only a handful of active players…you see where this is going, right?  Knowing on a daily basis how each member of the team is trending makes it easy to provide ongoing feedback and encouragement to help them avoid that disappointment.

Establish reporting to give you an update every day on which hosted players were at the property, what you spent on them and what they spent with you.  Aggregated according to your department’s goals, see how many new members joined or returned, how many overdue guests have come back, how much theoretical has grown, and how many trips the regulars have made.  Every day.  As soon as someone is off course, both the host and team leader are aware of it so corrections and adjustments can be made.  Now.

If you aren’t already tracking the achievements and pacing to goal for your PD team (or if you’re a host who is flying blind) please allow me to recommend that you begin by taking a look at past achievements in order to plan for the future.  Setting a benchmark allows you to look back at past performance to show growth or where efforts are lacking in comparison.  In my series about setting and tracking host goals, I suggest that breaking a goal down into equal parts spread over the course of the goal period allows one to track whether one is on pace or not for each goal and objective.  That way, it’s easy to determine where the hosts’ efforts should be concentrated on any given day in order to ultimately achieve the goals he’s working toward. If you are a team leader, you are already responsible for reporting on the achievements of your team, and you need to be able to speak to their individual achievements as well as the aggregated accomplishments of your team.  So it makes sense to track how the hosts perform over time and note trends, how often they reach objectives and goals and which ones present a challenge to the team.

Using the benchmark, it’s a simple matter to show either the host or the C-suite what the strengths and weaknesses are for the team as a whole or as individuals, and where daily information has had an impact.  Along the way, be sure to compare the PD team’s results to property performance amid any market fluctuations, weather issues, construction, etc. that may have affected numbers.

Your host team should be driving play at a higher frequency, activity percentage, average theoretical and profitability than the direct mail program does.  Ideally, you’d be able to compare and contrast hosted players with unhosted players of similar worth, as in a split test.  If the hosted players aren’t spending more time and money at your property than those who don’t have a host, figuring out why can have a positive impact on your property’s bottom line.  Individual hosts who understand which players to move and why will also see their bottom line increase if your program includes bonuses for goal achievement.  That way, everybody wins!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s